Obama calls for tougher Internet regulation

Obama calls for tougher Internet regulation

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Monday embraced a radical alter in how the government treats Internet service, coming down on the side of consumer activists who fear slower download speeds & higher costs yet angering Republicans & the nation's cable giants who say the plan would kill jobs.

Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to more heavily regulate Internet providers & treat broadband much as it would any other public utility. He said the FCC should explicitly prohibit Internet providers like Verizon & AT&T from charging data hogs like Netflix extra to move their content more quickly. The announcement sent cable stocks tumbling.

The FCC, an independent regulatory body led by political appointees, is nearing a decision on whether broadband providers should be allowed to cut deals with the content providers yet is stumbling over the legal complexities.

p>"We are stunned the president would abandon the longstanding, bipartisan policy of lightly regulating the Internet & calling for extreme" regulation, said Michael Powell, president & CEO of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, the primary lobbying arm of the cable industry, which supplies much of the nation's Internet access.

This "tectonic shift in national policy, should it be adopted, would create devastating results," added Powell, who chaired the FCC during the Bush administration until 2005.

Consumer groups & content providers hailed Obama's move, with Netflix posting to its Facebook page that "consumers should pick winners & losers on the Internet, not broadband gatekeepers."

"Net neutrality" is the idea that Internet service providers shouldn't block, slow or manipulate data moving across its networks. As long as content isn't against the law, such as child pornography or pirated music, a file or video posted on one site will load generally at the same speed as a similarly sized file or video on another site.

In 2010, the FCC embraced the concept in a rule. But last January, a federal appeals court struck down the regulation because the court said the FCC didn't technically have the legal authority to tell broadband providers how to manage their networks.

The uncertainty has prompted the public to file some 3.7 million comments with the FCC — more than double the number filed after Janet Jackson's infamous wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl.

On Monday, Obama waded into the fray & gave a major boost to Internet activists by saying the FCC should explicitly ban any "paid prioritization" on the Internet. Obama moreover suggested that the FCC reclassify consumer broadband as a public utility under the 1934 Communications Act. That would mean the Internet would be regulated more heavily in the way phone service is.

"It is usual sense that the same philosophy should guide any service that is based on the transmission of information — whether a phone call, or a packet of data," Obama said.

This approach is exactly what industry lobbyists have spent months fighting against. While Internet providers say they support the concept of an open Internet they want flexibility to think up new ways to package & sell Internet services. And, given the billions of dollars spent to improve network infrastructure, some officials say it's only fair to make data hogs like Netflix bear some of the costs of handling heavy traffic.

AT&T on Monday threatened legal action if the FCC adopted Obama's plan, while Comcast Corp. said reclassifying broadband regulation would be "a radical reversal that would harm investment & innovation, as today's immediate stock market reaction demonstrates." Similar statements were released by Time Warner Cable Inc. & several industry groups including CTIA-The Wireless Association, USTelecom, the Telecommunications Industry Association & Broadband for America.

Many Republicans including House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, & Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky sided with industry in denouncing the plan as government overreach.

"'Net Neutrality' is Obamacare for the Internet," declared Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, a tea party favorite, on Twitter. "The Internet should not operate at the speed of government."

The Internet Association, which represents many content providers like Netflix, Twitter, eBay & Google, applauded Obama's proposal.

On Monday, as the Standard & Poor's 500 index edged up slightly, huge cable companies slid. Time Warner Cable, Comcast, Cablevision & Charter Communications dropped 2 percent to 4 percent in the hours immediately after the announcement.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, a former industry lobbyist & venture capitalist, has said he is open to using a "hybrid" approach that would draw from both Title II of the 1934 law & the 1996 Telecommunications Act. On Monday, Wheeler said he welcomed the president's comments, yet suggested that his proposal was easier said than done.

"The more deeply we examined the issues around the various legal options, the more it has become plain that there is more work to do," Wheeler said. "The reclassification & hybrid approaches before us raise substantive legal questions. We found we would need more time to examine these to ensure that whatever approach is taken, it can withstand any legal challenges it may face."

The FCC isn't under a deadline to make a decision.

The president's statement all yet guarantees that the major cable companies will spend the next few months trying to encourage Congress to step in to protect their interests. Still, Internet activists are hoping that Obama's position will go a long way, even as his popularity among his party has waned.

"When the leader of the free world says the Internet should remain free, that's a game changer," said Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass.

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Follow Anne Flaherty on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AnneKFlaherty

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AP business writer Michael Liedtke contributed to this report from San Francisco.

Politics & GovernmentGovernmentBarack ObamaInternet serviceNetflix

Source: “Associated Press”

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