UN: Yemen’s warring sides resume talks on prisoner exchange

CAIRO (AP) — Sunday, Yemen Warring Sides reopened the United Nations-backed talks on a prisoner swap, said the World Corporation, more than three months after the largest war exchange was concluded.

The talks between leaders of the internationally recognised government and the Houthi rebels in Jordan's capital, Amman, were held less than a week after the US appointed the Iranian sponsored rebels as a terrorist organization.

Martin Griffiths, the UN Special envoy to Yemen, urged the meeting in Amman to prioritize the "immediate and unconditional release of all sick, injured, elderly, child detainees and any civil prisoners, including women, who were arbitrarily detained."

The talks are mediated by the United Nations in Amman.

Griffiths' office said, and the Foreign Committee of the Red Cross.

In October, the warring parties completed the biggest exchange of prisoners of war, freeing over 1,000 prisoners.

This has accompanied the sporadic releases of hundreds of inmates in the past two years, also a sign of good will, encouraging optimism that in Sweden, the sides will introduce a peace agreement in 2018.

The ravaging violence in Yemen erupted in 2014 when the Houthis confiscated Sanaa, the capital, and most of the north of the region.

This led a U.S.-sponsored Arab military alliance to interfere month after month in an attempt to return Yemeni President Abed Rabu Mansur Hadi's government to power.

The meeting in Amman accompanied the Houthis being designated a "foreign terrorist organization," which became a label on Jan. 19, a day before the inauguration of Joe Biden as president.

The U.S. change prompted the United Nations.

Secretary-General and other representatives of humanitarian relief advise Washington to reverse its designation to avert widespread hunger and death in Yemen.

Yemen is in the worst humanitarian situation in the world.

The war that killed more than 112,000 people, wrecked bridges, hospitals, water, electricity and other facilities in the region.

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