NATO, acting US Pentagon chief discuss Afghanistan

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg commented on the alliance's determination to remain in Afghanistan for as long as possible to the new acting US Secretary for Defense, his spokesperson on Monday said, speculating that President Donold Trump will order a rapid removal of US forces in the region.

Oana Lungescu, NATO spokeswoman, told Stoltenberg, on Friday, on a "agendas," the situation in Afghanistan and the "position of NATO has not changed" on its security feature in the conflict-ravaged region, which included 30-nation US-led military alliance.

"No ally of NATO would want to remain longer than required.

At the same time, we want to protect the advantages gained with this sacrifice and make Afghanistan a safe place for jihadists who may threaten the United States or some other NATO ally again said Lungescu.

Two years after a US-led alliance expelled the Taliban for the shelter of former al-Qaeda chief Ozama bin Laden, NATO took control of the international security campaign in Afghanistan in 2003.

In 2014, it started to train the Afghan security forces and guide them, but eventually pulled out their troops in compliance with a U.S. peace treaty.

"We support and are continuing to adjust our presence in Afghanistan as part of the peace process," said Lungescu.

She stated that NATO's strength has declined "to fewer than 12,000 soldiers, with more than half of them non-US.

Strengths."

At least half of the soldiers engaged in Resolute Help are also portrayed by Americans.

In August approximately 8,000 U.S. soldiers participated.

NATO and its allies depend on the activities of US air force, transport, communications and medical help.

The mission is impossible to succeed or even quit without considerable US assistance.

Lungescu said NATO allies "will continue consultations on the future of our mission in Afghanistan and we are prepared to adapt our mission further in a coordinated and on-site basis."

In Afghanistan, even as the talks of government and the Taliban meet in Qatar to end decades of grinding wars in Afghanistan in recent months, aggression and instability have escalated.

Both sides have progressed none.

In a suicide bomb attack in Kabul on Friday, at least two security troops were assassinated and 4 others were injured.

None assumed blame instantly, but blame dropped on the Taliban immediately.

The US military was blindsided by the argument like NATO allies. Trump posted on Oct. 7 that the small number of BRAVE men and women in Afghanistan should be there by Christmas."

Trump shot the United States last week.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper, with the Miller, who recently worked as the National Counterter-Terrorism Center's Head, installing three ardent loyalists in top defense positions.

Esper has been meeting with military officials to negotiate Trump's full departure troops from Afghanistan and Syria.

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