New York moves to raise state minimum wage to $15 for fast-food workers

New York moves to raise state minimum wage to $15 for fast-food workers

By Sebastien Malo

NEW YORK (Reuters) – New York moved on Wednesday to raise the minimum wage for fast-food workers to $15 an hour by the end of 2018 in New York City & by mid-2021 in the rest of the state.

The New York Wage Board voted unanimously for the increase, which would cover some 180,000 workers statewide & affect fast-food chains with 30 locations or more in the United States.

p> The three-member board was formed at the behest of Governor Andrew Cuomo in May after the state legislature turned down his proposals for minimum wage increases for most workers.

Its decision does not need legislative approval, yet requires approval by the state labor commissioner, which is expected.

“This is going to assist hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, yet this is going to do something else," said a beaming Cuomo at a jubilant rally in New York City celebrating the vote. "Because when New York acts, the rest of the states follow."

With the federal minimum wage at $7.25 an hour since 2009, labor & religious groups have pressed state & local governments to enact pay raises as their hopes dim for an increase by the Republican-controlled U.S. Congress.

Last month, Los Angeles set its minimum wage to rise from $9 an hour to $15 by 2020, affecting some 600,000 workers.

Seattle & San Francisco moreover have increased minimum wages in recent years.

A statewide wage increase for fast-food workers as opposed to city-based would be a first, said the National Employment Law Project, a nonprofit advocacy group.

The rise to $15 an hour marks a major step from New York's current minimum wage of $8.75.

"I feel fabulous," said Harley Perez, 19, who work 30 hours a week at a fast-food restaurant yet depends on food stamps to obtain by.

"I won't have this chokehold with bills, & I won't need to depend so much on the government for help," she said.

Sixty percent of New York's fast-food workers rely on some form of public benefit to supplement their earnings, according to the Fiscal Policy Institute.

The increase would be phased in, taking effect by the end of 2018 in New York City & by July 1, 2021, in the rest of the state.

Business groups & other critics slammed the decision as discriminatory because it singles out one industry, & legal challenges are expected.

minimum wageNew York CityNew Yorkfederal minimum wageGovernor Andrew Cuomo

Source: “Reuters”

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